What are the names of some gods in Roman mythology?

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When Rome conquered Greece, it incorporated the Greek gods into its own pantheon. So many Roman gods took on the traits and characteristics of the Greek gods. The major Roman Gods became indistinguishable from their Greek counterparts. Jupiter, for example, is essentially Zeus. Cupid (Roman god of love and romance)...

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When Rome conquered Greece, it incorporated the Greek gods into its own pantheon. So many Roman gods took on the traits and characteristics of the Greek gods. The major Roman Gods became indistinguishable from their Greek counterparts. Jupiter, for example, is essentially Zeus. Cupid (Roman god of love and romance) is nearly indistinguishable from Eros (Greek god of the same).

Over time, the distinctly Roman Gods (those that had no Greek equivalent) became less prominent. Some faded altogether, their characteristics and powers subsumed by other deities. Dis Pater, Roman god of land for example, was absorbed into Pluto, Greek god of the underworld. 

Not all uniquely Roman Gods fell into oblivion. A number of key Roman deities survived the pantheon clash and continued to be worshiped in their own right. Janus, Roman god of transition, change, beginnings, and endings, was heavily worshiped throughout the Roman empire. Janus was the central deity in many Roman ceremonies marking life transitions. He was prominent in birth ceremonies and funerals, as well as New Year's celebrations and other markers of seasonal change.

Other uniquely Roman Gods without Greek counterparts include: Mithras, patron deity of soldiers; Orcus, punisher of the damned; and the Lares, deities of hearthfire, family, and home. 

 

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