Rudyard Kipling

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What are the moral values for the poem "IF" by Rudyard Kipling? I would like to have an example for each moral values.

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Steph Müller eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Rudyard Kipling's "If" provides reference to a large volume of moral values. In the very first line, Kipling appeals to his reader to "keep your head" when everyone else is losing theirs. This refers to the moral value of remaining rational even under trying circumstances.

One couplet I particularly like in the second stanza reads, "If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster / And treat those two impostors just the same." This refers to the moral value of optimism and of facing tough times with the same tenacity with which you face good times.

The third stanza provides another great example: "If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew; / To serve your turn long after they are gone." This line talks about the moral value of perseverance and continuing on toward your goal even when your heart and body are exhausted and want...

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mamat | Student

intergrity,patience

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frizzyperm | Student

“If you can keep your head when all about you,
 Are losing theirs and blaming it on you."

Then you probably have no idea about what's really going on.

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