What is the moral of Twelfth Night?

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As a romantic comedy, Twelfth Night is about love, and it certainly teaches the audience some lessons about love. While love in this play love is true, but it is also fickle, irrational, and excessive.  Love wanes over time, as does its chief cause, physical beauty.  As the play opens, Duke Orsino expresses the idea of love's excess and waning,

If music be the food of love, play on,

Give me excess of it, that, surfeiting,

The appetitie may sicken, and so die.

That strain again! It had a dying fall; ....

Enough!  No more! (1.1.1-11) 

Orsino also demonstrates the irrationality and fickleness of love as he pursues Olivia recklessly, but at the end of the play, he gives her up to Sebastian, then falling in love with Cesario when "he" reveals himself to be Viola.

Moreover, love is also madness.  In Act I, after seeing Cesario for the first time, Olivia is madly in love:

I do I know not what, and fear to find

Mine eye too great a flatterer...

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