The Most Dangerous Game by Richard Edward Connell

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What is the moral or lesson in "The Most Dangerous Game"?

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David Morrison eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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I would argue that the overriding lesson of the story is that human beings are more than just animals, whatever General Zaroff might think. According to him, humans are simply a superior species of animal; nothing more, nothing less. And this species is itself divided between allegedly higher and lower specimens. (No prizes for guessing which subdivision Zaroff thinks he belongs to).

However, even the good guy of the story, Rainsford, appears to share Zaroff's repellent world view. His triumphant killing of Zaroff indicates that he too has internalized the morally reprehensible idea that human beings are just superior animals and that he, as one of the strongest specimens, is thereby entitled to take the life of an inferior specimen (i.e., General Zaroff).

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leospengler eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Richard Connell's classic short story "The Most Dangerous Game " (1924) regards Sanger Rainsford's escape from General Zaroff's game of hunting shipwrecked sailors on his private island. Rainsford initially fails to elude Zaroff but...

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litteacher8 eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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