What moral lesson can you receive on "Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey"?

The moral lesson that you can receive from “Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey” is that we are inextricably linked to the natural world as part of a fundamental unity. Because of this, when nature changes, or perceptions of nature and of ourselves change accordingly.

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The moral lesson Wordsworth hopes to convey in "Tintern Abeey" is that developing a relationship with the natural world can elevate our souls and bring us closer to God. In nature, we can find the deeper peace and joy that is not always evident in our busy lives. When we...

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The moral lesson Wordsworth hopes to convey in "Tintern Abeey" is that developing a relationship with the natural world can elevate our souls and bring us closer to God. In nature, we can find the deeper peace and joy that is not always evident in our busy lives. When we contemplate nature, we glimpse the true reality:

With an eye made quiet by the power
Of harmony, and the deep power of joy,
We see into the life of things.
In other words, nature can offer us insight into the divine.
Wordsworth also wants to communicate that a soul in harmony with nature does not need to physically be there to gain solace from its beauty and divine power. The memory of nature is a well from which we can continuously draw to feed our souls. When the speaker feels overwhelmed by "the fever of the world," he turns to memory:
O sylvan Wye! thou wanderer thro' the woods,
How often has my spirit turned to thee!
What he means is that when is stressed, he returns to his "happy place," and recollects the river Wye that seems to meander aimlessly and wander without care through the woods by Tintern Abbey. This gives solace to his spirit.
As Wordsworth's speaker returns over and over to Tintern Abbey, a familiar spot, he can also measure his spiritual growth. He notes that by going back to the same location, he can perceive how his relationship to it changes. Even though he, as an adult, can no longer react to it with the spontaneous joy and delight he experienced when he was a child, he now can more fully sense the divine force that infuses nature:
And I have felt
A presence that disturbs me with the joy
Of elevated thoughts; a sense sublime
Of something far more deeply interfused
Go to nature, Wordsworth says: it will elevate your soul.
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As a good Romantic, Wordsworth has a very elevated understanding of nature. He doesn't just see the natural world as a storehouse of pretty objects, nice trees, flowers, rainbows, and the like. He passionately believes that it is a living, breathing force of which we as humans are a vital part.

That being the case, we can gain an elevated insight into ourselves by perceiving the natural world around us. Put simply, to know nature is to know ourselves. This is certainly the abiding moral lesson one gleans from “Tintern Abbey,” where a return to a place he'd last visited years before provides a catalyst for the speaker's reflections on himself and the life that he has led. In that sense, the contemplation of nature provides the speaker with a vital source of moral reflection; it puts into perspective the speaker's life and how it relates to that of humanity as a whole. Nature is a great teacher.

By contemplating this remarkable scene of natural beauty, the speaker is able to realize just how much he's changed since the last time he was here. Yet at the same time, he sees continuity between his current and younger selves, just as he sees the continuity of the landscape he now beholds with the landscape he once enjoyed as a youth.

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The moral lesson that lies at the heart of this impressive poem is one that is intimately connected to Wordsworth's understanding of nature and the human condition. It talks of the link between our ability as humans to perceive nature and nature itself. The poem presents Wordsworth's idea that perception is the chief way in which we perceive and interact wth nature, and that our perception is something that will change with time as we grow and develop.

This theme is presented through the different way in which the poet perceives the beauty of Tintern Abbey as a youth and his more mature perspective now. Five years on, he has a less passionate veiw of nature that is more meditative and reflective, and he does not now think that nature is divorced from the human condition. Even though Wordsworth has lost that passionate intensity, he does not grieve this loss:

For I have learned
To look on nature, not as in the hour
Of thoughtless youth; but hearing oftentimes

The still, sad music of humanity,
Nor harsh nor grating, though of ample power
To chasten and subdue.

This poem therefore establishes that our perception of nature changes as we develop and mature, and that we are intimately connected with nature in a way that has the potential to open us up to the many lessons that we can learn from nature--if we have ears to listen to them.

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