What is the mood of John Updike's "A & P?"

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In "A&P," the mood shifts: it feels light, apprehensive, aroused, nervous, triumphant, and finally extremely apprehensive. Initially, Sammy's mood is relatively light. He at work and the day is quite typical except for the girls in bikinis. Now, he does imply that the other frequent customers find the girls' attire too risqué, and therefore this creates a rise in tension for those customers. Sammy is aroused by this spectacle and by Queenie in particular. Externally, Sammy plays it cool. His behavior remains somewhat light as he jokes with Stokesie about this rare sight at the A&P. But with the uncomfortable customers and Sammy's intrigue, the mood shifts with rising tension.

Sammy tells us when the mood shifts again. He notes,

Now here comes the sad part of the story, at least my family says it's sad but I don't think it's sad myself.

Much to Sammy's delight, the girls come through his line, and Queenie produces the money from her top. It is at this point that Sammy adds,

Then...

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