What is the mood in John Green's The Fault in our Stars

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On the top of the cover of the book, in blue hand-written looking text, there is a quote by Jodi Picoult that actually describes the mood perfectly: "Electric. . . Filled with staccato bursts of humor and tragedy ." This is a wonderful description of the story as well as life....

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On the top of the cover of the book, in blue hand-written looking text, there is a quote by Jodi Picoult that actually describes the mood perfectly: "Electric. . . Filled with staccato bursts of humor and tragedy." This is a wonderful description of the story as well as life. Green captures the human condition perfectly because even though people do face life-threatening illnesses, which is tragic, life can still be filled with love and humor around every corner. The mood reflects the themes and lessons of life, no matter how short that life may be.

One example of a scene in the book that shows both humor and tragedy all in one is when Hazel first watches Isaac and Gus play video games in the basement. Isaac is going through a breakup, so he is vulnerable, but the relationship between Gus and Hazel is just beginning. All three characters face life-threatening illnesses. But do they sit around moping about their plight? Well, maybe Isaac does, but he's more upset about the loss of his girlfriend than his eyesight. Gus has the best attitude of all and it is reflected in his speech.

"Isaac, I feel a growing concern about our position. If you agree, head over to that power station, and I'll cover you" (57).

Augustus is full of funny dialogue aligned perfectly with compassionate will-power. At the end of this scene, for instance, Isaac bursts into a temper tantrum and Gus, like the best friend ever, is right there by his side encouraging him. Isaac even breaks basketball trophies and Augustus tells him to "Get it!"

"Augustus stepped toward him and looked down. 'Feel better?' he asked.

'No,' Isaac mumbled, his chest heaving.

'That's the thing about pain,' Augustus said, and then glanced back at me. 'It demands to be felt'" (63).

This is a great example of life and the human experience. We can be faced with the most traumatic and devastating futures, but we can also have positive attitudes in the present if we choose. Readers are in for a definite emotional roller coaster in this book.

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