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There Will Come Soft Rains

by Ray Bradbury
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What is the mood as the house in "There Will Come Soft Rains" is destroyed by fire? Does the author present wild panic and frenzy, matter-of-fact acceptance, unconcern, or anger?

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In "There Will Come Soft Rains ," the house is an unthinking, emotionless machine, so the story's mood stays, for the most part, as being matter-of-fact. However, in the moments leading up to the house's destruction, the mood shifts to a more frenzied state, but that subsides as the...

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In "There Will Come Soft Rains," the house is an unthinking, emotionless machine, so the story's mood stays, for the most part, as being matter-of-fact. However, in the moments leading up to the house's destruction, the mood shifts to a more frenzied state, but that subsides as the house dies.

The matter-of-fact mood is evident from the first sentence in the story's final section: "At ten o'clock the house began to die." However, this quickly shifts into a frenzied state as the mechanical rats attempt to put out the fire ("scurrying water rats squeaked from the walls, pistoled their water, and ran for more."). As objects began dying in the house, they contributed to this frenzied state. In the nursery, "Blue lions roared, purple giraffes bounded off. The panthers ran in circles, changing color, and ten million animals, running before the fire, vanished off toward a distant steaming river..." Then other objects in the house commit their final acts:

"...other choruses...could be heard announcing the time, playing music, cutting the lawn by remote-control mower, or setting an umbrella frantically out and in, the slamming and opening a front door, a thousand things happening..."

When the house is destroyed and is nothing but "rubble and steam," once again the matter-of-fact mood returns and the house, as it did earlier in the story, repeats the date.

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