What might Faulkner's opinion be of his character Abner Snopes in the story "Barn Burning"?  How does he convey his attitude? 

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It is difficult to say what exactly a writer might think of a character that they themselves create. Many times we find a character that we cannot help but absolutely despise, but can such an antagonistic feeling be felt towards a character from an artist who thought up their every moment? We as the readers are certainly compelled to hate Abner Snopes. The man is vicious and cruel, with a disregard for the well-being of others that seems half-childish and half-sociopathic. While his entire worldview spawns from his dissatisfaction with his place in the southern social hierarchy, he seems to not act in any way that might better his position or even abolish the class disparity that he resents. He has become filled with a mindless wrath, lashing out at anything that he can hurt.

In this regard, it might be that Faulkner has written Snopes as more of a static force than as a functioning character. Snopes is often described with animal features, and it seems that the method by which Faulkner...

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