What is the meter and diction in the poem "The Road Not Taken"?We are doing a project where we have to research a poem, and these two aspects are giving me a hard time, I figured that the diction...

What is the meter and diction in the poem "The Road Not Taken"?

We are doing a project where we have to research a poem, and these two aspects are giving me a hard time, I figured that the diction is mainly concrete, and the poem is in iambic tetrameter.

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shake99 | Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

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Diction usually refers to word choice. This is an interesting aspect of the Robert Frost poem “The Road Not Taken.” Although the poem is obviously symbolic in nature, it’s word choice is pretty straightforward. But there is one idea that he seems to be developing with this word choice. That idea is uncertainty or indecision.

In the second half of line 3, stanza 1, Frost writes “long I stood.” This implies that his speaker is having a hard time making up his mind.

In line 2, stanza 2, he writes, “And having perhaps the better claim.” The word perhaps suggests that he’s not really sure.

In line 4, stanza 2, he writes, “Though as for that the passing there.” This certainly doesn’t sound very decisive.

In line 5, stanza 3, he writes “I doubted if I should ever come back.” The word “doubted” means maybe, again, he’s just not sure.

And finally, in the last stanza he repeats the word “I.” “Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, and I—I took the one less traveled by.” This repetition communicates a sense of hesitation on the part of the speaker. He can’t quite come out and declare his decision with conviction.

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