What is the metaphor in "Two Kinds" by Amy Tan?

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The narrator refers to "the prodigy in [her]" as a child when she imagined all the possibilities for her fame-filled, glorious future, possibilities fed by her mother's urging and insistence.  This prodigy becomes a metaphor for the narrator's inner feelings.  However, the more her mother tested her, the more she failed: naming capitals, doing multiplication tables, saying everything she remembered from a page in the Bible, and so on.  She began to feel that "something inside [her] began to die" because of all the disappointment she so clearly saw on her mother's face.

Soon, she looks in the mirror and feels as though she can see the prodigy's reflection, and "The girl staring back at [her] was angry, powerful. . . . [She] had new thoughts, willful thoughts—or rather, thoughts filled with lots of won'ts."  It is not a prodigy inside her;...

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