What message/s in common does Khaled Hosseini try to transmit through his two novels, The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns?what do the novels have in common? What themes, lessons, messages...

What message/s in common does Khaled Hosseini try to transmit through his two novels, The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns?

what do the novels have in common? What themes, lessons, messages does Hosseini focus on in these novels?

Asked on by nochi

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scarletpimpernel | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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There are several similar messages in Hosseini's first two books.  I've listed two below, but they are certainly not exclusive.

1. Dignity in the face of adversity--In The Kite Runner, Hassan and his father Ali best illustrate this message. Ali will not stand idly by while his son suffers from Assef's bullying and Amir's coldness.  He leaves the best home he has ever known and a boss (Baba) who cares for him and Hassan and trusts them because he will not allow anyone--even Amir, a rich Pashtun who is supposedly Hassan's friend--to harm his son again. Similarly, Hassan experiences the harshest relationships and conditions while managing to create a contented and loving family and avoiding losing his faith in mankind or in his God.

In A Thousand Splendid Suns, Mariam best demonstrates dignity in the face of adversity.  As a woman and as an illegitimate child, she faces undeniably difficult lifelong struggles, and while she does originally allow her father and husband to rob her of her dignity at times, she ultimately claims her honor in the end and realizes her own self-worth.

2. Personal redemption--Both of Hosseini's novel stress that a human must find the strength within to confront past wrongs and to right those wrongs. Amir struggles throughout The Kite Runner to rid himself of his guilt from betraying Hassan, but it is only when he travels back to Afghanistan and rescues Sohrab that he is able to begin the actual process of self-redemption. Likewise, Mariam and Laila from Suns both view elements of their past with guilt or regret, and while they do learn to depend upon and trust one another, each woman realizes that she must take action to find inner peace.  Mariam's redemption for not defending herself earlier in life involves her becoming a martyr and heroine for the sake of Laila and her children.  Laila's redemption--though not quite as dramatic as Mariam's--involves forgiving herself for teenage "sin" and eventually recognizing that she does have a right to be happy.

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