What message is Ray Bradbury giving in his short story "The Veldt"?

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Blaze Bergstrom eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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In Ray Bradbury’s story, the parents, George and Lydia, have tried to be good parents but have been seduced by materialism. Combined with the supposed technological advantages of the artificial environment they install in their home, the professional advice they seek only serves to further distance them from their children, Peter and Wendy. Through “The Veldt,” Bradbury reminds the reader that parental involvement is an ongoing, constant process. The parents are disconnected from their children, who in turn have lost interest in the emotional connections at the heart of family relationships. The children are undeniably intelligent and creative, but they have taken on the role of adults and reprogrammed the virtual veldt. Left too much to their own devices, they have interpreted their parents’ seeming lack of genuine concern for them as antagonism. Buying things and services is no substitute for close involvement, as these parents learn too late.

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The message is that you should be...

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