What is the message in the poem "The Law of the Jungle" in The Jungle Book?

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We can learn a lot from wolves.  Pohnpei did a good job explaining the benefits of wolf responsibility and how humans can learn a lot from their wolf society in Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book as a whole and "The Law of the Jungle" specifically.  Let's take a look at some specifics of the poem that show the rights and responsibilities of wolves (and people).

Interestingly enough, Kipling begins with the responsibilities and ENDS with the rights!  Both are almost always contained in the first line of a stanza.  Let's begin with what Kipling does:  responsibilities.  There are many, but here are a few important ones

Ye may kill for yourselves, and your mates, / ...
But kill not for pleasure


The Kill of the Pack is the meat of the Pack


The Kill of the Wolf is the meat of the Wolf.

If humans need to learn one thing it is not to kill "for pleasure."  Wolves, according to Kipling, have the same responsibility.  You will see quickly that rights and responsibilities begin to...

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