What do the men think of Granny Cain in Toni Cade Bambara's "Blues Ain't No Mockin' Bird"?  

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In Toni Cade Bambara's "Blues Ain't No Mockin' Bird," it is evident the men trying to film Granny and her house see Granny as their subordinate and as a worthless human being.Though skin color is never mentioned in the story, it is evident through the dialect used...

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In Toni Cade Bambara's "Blues Ain't No Mockin' Bird," it is evident the men trying to film Granny and her house see Granny as their subordinate and as a worthless human being.

Though skin color is never mentioned in the story, it is evident through the dialect used by the characters that the story is one of race relations set in the South. The men are from the county and are filming for the "food stamp campaign," and only white men would be working for the county at the time period in which the story is set; since the story was written in 1971, it could be set in 1971 or earlier. If the men are white men working for the county, then we know the Cains are an African American family living on the outskirts of town, and the men want to film the Cains' lifestyle since the Cains are some of the county's citizens who would be benefiting from the new food stamp program. Yet, the men aren't there to prove to the county there is a need for food stamps; they're there to do the exact opposite, which shows their lack of respect for Granny and her socioeconomic class.

When one of the men notes that Granny has her own vegetable garden and asserts, "If more folks did that, see, there'd be no need--," the reader is able to deduce the men are filming in order to prove that the poor aren't really as poor as the county thinks and there is no reason for the county to spend money on food stamps. The men's true motive for filming shows us that they see Granny, and others of her socioeconomic class, as unimportant human beings and feel a sense of superiority over Granny and others.

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