What is meant by: "They were not simple folk, you see, though they were happy. But we do not say the words of cheer anymore. All smiles have become archaic." Is the author foreshadowing here, by implying there was one incident that changed the view of Omelas? Or has this always been a view of Omelas that no one was willing to admit? How does this section of the story relate to the theme and argument of the story?

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In describing the citizens of Omelas, the narrator says,

They were not simple folk, you see, though they were happy. But we do not say the words of cheer anymore. All smiles have become archaic.

The narrator is concerned that we understand how nuanced the people of Omelas are. They aren't some simply happy folk who are thoughtless and ignorant. No, they are essentially everything that we...

(The entire section contains 207 words.)

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