Inward Eye

What is the meaning of "inward eye" and "bliss of solitude" in "Daffodils" by William Wordsworth?

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Wordsworth apparently had the ability to visualize things very distinctly in his mind, undoubtedly in full colors. This is a faculty that only certain individuals are born with. Brain specialists can distinguish the part of the human brain that controls internal visualization. No doubt great painters like Van Gogh and...

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Wordsworth apparently had the ability to visualize things very distinctly in his mind, undoubtedly in full colors. This is a faculty that only certain individuals are born with. Brain specialists can distinguish the part of the human brain that controls internal visualization. No doubt great painters like Van Gogh and Monet have the faculty to an exceptional degree, and Wordsworth's vivid visual imagination may explain why he became a great poet. His "inward eye" is just his visual imagination. Evidently he was accustomed to utilizing it when he was alone and had nothing in particular to occupy his attention. "For oft when on my couch I lie / In vacant or in pensive mood . . ." He was noted for being especially susceptible to visual sensations, and he sought them out during the many hours he spent on his walks. His poetry is full of visual imagery.

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