What is the meaning of each stanza in the poem "White-Eyes" by Mary Oliver?

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Mary Oliver's poem "White-Eyes" does not follow a traditional stanza structure, and some thoughts continue from one stanza into the next one. I will attempt to give a stanza-by-stanza analysis, but sometimes will have to join parts of two stanzas.
The first two stanzas read:
In winter
all the...

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Mary Oliver's poem "White-Eyes" does not follow a traditional stanza structure, and some thoughts continue from one stanza into the next one. I will attempt to give a stanza-by-stanza analysis, but sometimes will have to join parts of two stanzas.
The first two stanzas read:
In winter
all the singing is in
the tops of the trees
where the wind-bird
with its white eyes
shoves and pushes
among the branches.
Like any of us (1-9)
Oliver imagines winter as a bird that perches in the trees and begins as wind that by the end of the poem materializes into snow. Here, the bird figuratively captures the features of winter, like "its white eyes" and the way the "wind-bird" ... "shoves and pushes / among the branches."
The next complete thought begins at the end of stanza 2 and continues,
he wants to go to sleep,
but he's restless—
he has an idea,
and slowly it unfolds
from under his beating wings
as long as he stays awake.
But his big, round music, after all,
is too breathy to last. (10-17)
The third and fourth stanzas further the image of the bird as winter. The equivalency of the readers and the bird is asserted in lines 9 and 10. The bird "wants to go to sleep," but apparently he has work to do. The "idea" the bird has is what creates winter. The energy he generates "as long as he stays away" becomes the season. The work leading up to winter will come to an end, though, as his effort "is too breathy to last."
The next stanza is relatively self-contained. Oliver writes,
So, it's over.
In the pine-crown
he makes his nest,
he's done all he can. (18-21)
The bird's work is finished. The transformation is about to be complete. He can now rest and let his work take shape.
Oliver continues,
I don't know the name of this bird,
I only imagine his glittering beak
tucked in a white wing
while the clouds—
which he has summoned
from the north—
which he has taught
to be mild, and silent— (22-29)
Here, the poet reveals the bird as figurative, as she can "only imagine" what it looks like. What remains true, though, is that it is characterized by the signature color of winter: white. The bird is given the power to "summon" the clouds and to basically tame the clouds to do as he bids.
The thought about the bird's control of the clouds continues into the next stanza and leads into the final stanza of the poem:
thicken, and begin to fall
into the world below
like stars, or the feathers
of some unimaginable bird
that loves us,
that is asleep now, and silent—
that has turned itself
into snow. (30-37)
The imagery of the clouds falling to earth is described as soft and beautiful, "like stars, or the feathers / of some unimaginable bird." The final stanza begins with a significant line indicating that the bird "loves us." This is interesting considering the power invested in the bird / winter earlier in the poem. The poem suggests that this bird does what he does for us; even though he, like us, was tired, he musters up the energy to do this important work. He "is asleep now, and silent," as we can imagine the peaceful snowy landscape outside. The bird's figurative meaning becomes literal as the poem ends, and he has materialized "into snow."
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"White Eyes" by Mary Oliver is a poem about winter beginning and ending. The white-eyed bird in the first stanza is symbolic of that winter season. The wind begins blowing at the tops of the trees. Winter wants to sleep, but the winds continue to blow, and the cold comes in gusts. The white-eyed bird dropping its feathers represents the snow flakes falling. The clouds come in from the north, and the snow begins to fall--the great wind bird spreading its wings and flying as it releases its snowy feathers (snowflakes) all across the landscape. Finally, the bird sleeps, signifying the end of the winter. Mary Oliver uses symbolism effectively in her poem to describe winter, using a bird to summon the northern clouds and bring the snow.

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