What is the meaning of Dee changing her name to Wangero in ''Everyday Use''?

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In "Everyday Use," we meet a mother and her two daughters. Mama still lives with Maggie in a small, poor town. Her other daughter, Dee, has gone off to the university and has, at least to her own mind, become more sophisticated and cultured. Dee changes her name to Wangero and has brought a man named Asalamalakim home with her. Dee's name change and return home brings up questions of culture: who "owns" it, and to what use it should be put.

Dee/Wangero returns home confident and self-assured. She explains that she has changed her name as a statement about her freedom and control over her own identity, in the aftermath of slavery. She was named after a grandmother, but Wangero asks her family, who the first "Dee" was named by or after? Dee insists that she could trace the origins back to before the Civil War, implying that slave owners named a slave ancestor Dee. Wangero does not want to continue that history. 

Meanwhile, Wangero also wants to take home her grandmother's handmade quilts....

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