What is the meaning of the phrase "rainbow-tinted circles of light" in the poem "Bangle Sellers" by Sarojini Naidu?  

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The speaker of the poem is a bangle seller, and the poem is spoken as if it is a sales pitch. The narrator is trying to convince potential customers to buy some of her bangles. When she describes them as “delicate, bright / Rainbow-tinted circles of light,” she is implying...

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The speaker of the poem is a bangle seller, and the poem is spoken as if it is a sales pitch. The narrator is trying to convince potential customers to buy some of her bangles. When she describes them as “delicate, bright / Rainbow-tinted circles of light,” she is implying that her bangles are visually attractive (“bright”) and colorful (“Rainbow-tinted”). The metaphor "circles of light" implies that her bangles have perhaps a touch of the magical about them. The rhyming couplet (“bright . . . light”) also suggests the musicality of the speaker’s voice as she tries to entice people to buy her bangles.

Also, by advertising that her bangles are “Rainbow-tinted,” the speaker is reassuring her customers that her bangles are for everybody. No matter what someone’s favorite color might be, the bangle seller has bracelets with at least a little of that color. The quick succession of positive adjectives ("delicate, bright / Rainbow-tinted”) describing the bracelets is also a good sales technique because the speaker is almost overwhelming the customers with a cumulative impression of positivity.

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That phrase is a poetic description of the bracelets themselves. "Rainbow-tinted circles of light" is simply a beautiful way of saying "circular, shiny bracelets in many different colors."

"Rainbow-tinted" means that the bracelets are colored ("tinted") in many different hues. "Circles of light" means that the bracelets are round and that they reflect light--that is, they're shiny.

Naidu's poem uses imagery and color, as well as plenty of natural similes, to describe the bangles (solid, thin bracelets) that will be worn by young girls, by ladies about to get married, and by older women. These bangles are all beautiful and colorful; they are reflective of the joys these women experience in life, from childhood innocence to marriage to motherhood.

You can see an image of bangles like the ones celebrated in the poem here. However, the words of the poem should give you a good idea of how delicate and sparkling these bracelets are, and how they come in a rainbow of colors that remind you of mountain mist, fresh leaves, corn, and fire. To explore the cultural significance of bangles and the rituals involving these bracelets, so that you can understand why young girls, engaged women, and older women might wear them, you might start with this article.

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