What makes Victor Frankenstein less human than the monster he created in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein?

Expert Answers info

booboosmoosh eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2003

write4,119 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

There are several reason that Victor Frankenstein is (ironically) less human than the monster he has created in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

Victor defies the laws of society and religion when he steals dead bodies from graveyards—for cemetery's are hallowed (holy) ground. He also defies the laws of religion when he attempts—and succeeds—in imbuing inanimate flesh with life. He is playing God. Once Victor brings the creature to life, he refuses to assume responsibility for what he has done. He is just like a parent, and yet he does not care for the creature as a parent should, but abandons this defenseless being to the threats of society and the world. In Chapter Ten, now educated and able to converse with Victor, the creature chides the scientist for what he has done:

...you, my creator, detest and spurn me, thy creature, to whom thou art bound by ties only dissoluble by the annihilation of one of us. You purpose to kill me. How dare you sport thus with life?

I believe that Victor is...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 705 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


check Approved by eNotes Editorial

cruzcontrol eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2011

write15 answers

starTop subjects are Literature and Law and Politics

check Approved by eNotes Editorial