What makes Meursault happy?

In The Stranger, Meursault is made happy through simple sensual pleasures and comforts. By the end of the book, his full acceptance of the absurd also brings him happiness.

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Meursault's prime joy appears to be sensual in nature. He enjoys good food and good weather. He likes having sex with his charming girlfriend, Marie. He can appreciate beauty. For a man who does not put any emotional stock into his relationships, Meursault only seems to derive pleasure from physical...

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Meursault's prime joy appears to be sensual in nature. He enjoys good food and good weather. He likes having sex with his charming girlfriend, Marie. He can appreciate beauty. For a man who does not put any emotional stock into his relationships, Meursault only seems to derive pleasure from physical comforts such as these. He seeks no other real means of gratification, such by as trying to better himself or in forming connections with others. He is content with himself and his life as they are and is unable to pretend to want what society says he should want.

By the end of the novel, Meursault also finds happiness in accepting the idea that life is absurd by nature. Rejecting all conceptions of meaning, whether they come from religious creeds (as represented by the priest who visits Meursault after he is condemned to death by the horrified courtroom) or the idea that all actions have reasons behind them (such as his motiveless killing of the Arab man on the beach), Meursault is able to find peace once he accepts that because death comes for everyone, nothing in life itself matters much, whether one lives in good standing with the rest of society or not.

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