In Nothing But the Truth, what are the major inaccuracies present in Jennifer Stewart's article published on April 1st, and how might this newspaper article affect (or influence) people's vote on...

In Nothing But the Truth, what are the major inaccuracies present in Jennifer Stewart's article published on April 1st, and how might this newspaper article affect (or influence) people's vote on the new school budget and school board member election? Use specific details from the novel to support your answer. Cite all evidence correctly.

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Kristen Lentz | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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In the article published on April 1st, Jennifer Stewart makes multiple misleading statements, many of which could negatively impact the upcoming school board election and budget approval.  Stewart's opening sentence claims that Philip Malloy "was suspended for singing "The Star-Spangled Banner" (Avi 118).  This inaccuracy coupled with the description of Philip's parents having "raise[d] their son to have pride" in his country paints the incident to seem like a case of injustice, in which Ms. Narwin has unfairly targeted the boy for merely being patriotic (Avi 118).  In reality, Philip was "suspended for creating a disturbance" (Avi 120). Another inaccuracy occurs when Stewart claims that Philip sang the anthem "in every other class" (Avi 118).  In reality, Philip did not choose to sing the anthem in Mr. Lunser's class on March 15, because he was studying last minute "to pass an exam" (Avi 8).  Stewart's biased article does not include a perspective from Ms. Narwin, which would have undercut her attempt to portray Philip Malloy as a victim.

The article in the Manchester Record casts Harrison High School in a negative light, potentially causing many readers in the community to doubt or question the professionalism of school staff and the handling of discipline.  In an election year when the school district's budge is up for approval, even the slightest negative press could influence voters' decisions when heading to the polls.

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