What major event happens in this chapter 4 of The Outsiders?

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Chapter four of The Outsiders is the chapter that sets up the rest of the book. Pony and Johnny are in the park hanging out by the fountain. The two boys are talking about nothing too important when the Socs show up. Pony and Johnny realize they can't run away...

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Chapter four of The Outsiders is the chapter that sets up the rest of the book. Pony and Johnny are in the park hanging out by the fountain. The two boys are talking about nothing too important when the Socs show up. Pony and Johnny realize they can't run away in time, and have to face the Socs on their own. The Socs call Pony and Johnny losers and tell Pony that he needs to wash the grease out of him. They start dunking Pony in the fountain and Pony thinks he is going to drown. All of a sudden it all stops and Pony is relieved until he finds out the reason why it stopped.

Bob, the handsome Soc, was lying there in the moonlight, doubled up and still. A dark pool was growing from him, spreading slowly over the blue white cement. I looked at Johnny's hand. He was clutching the switchblade, and it was dark to the hilt. My stomach gave a violent jump and my blood turned icy.

This is the point when the whole story shifts. Johnny has killed Bob, and Pony has to try to figure out what to do. Pony knows that the police will be against the Greasers, and look at them as just a bunch of punk kids. Johnny did what he had to do to save Pony. We see in this chapter just how close the boys are to each other. They will always stick together and have each other's backs, no matter the consequences.

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Because their boyfriends were drunk, Cherry and Marcia start walking with Johnny and Ponyboy; this action brings the boys in the blue Mustang who tell the girls to get in with them. Of course, their appearance raises the tension. Then, after Johnny and Pony stop in a vacant lot and Pony falls asleep, his arrival home at 2:00 a.m. causes an enraged Darry to hit Pony.

In Chapter 4, Pony rushes out of the house and returns to Johnny; they walk to a park with a fountain. Shortly, the blue Mustang drives up and Randy and Bob are inside; they threaten Pony and Johnny, telling them to leave their girls alone. Further they call the Greasers "white trash with long hair." Consequently, a fight ensues and Pony gets knocked down. When he pulls himself up he makes a terrible discovery:

Bob, the handsome Soc, was lying there in the moonlight, doubled up and still. A dark pool was growing from him, spreading slowly over the blue white cement. I looked at Johnny's hand. He was clutching his switchblade, and it was dark to the hilt. My stomach gave a violent jump and my blood turned icy.

Johnny explains that the Socs were going to beat him as they had done before, and he just could not let them do it. When he stabbed Bob the others ran off. Of course, they know that Johnny is in serious trouble and the police will soon appear, so they try to find Dallas, an experienced tough-guy. When they reach Dallas at his rodeo friend's place, he listens to the boys and takes them into his bedroom. There he gives the boys dry clothes and takes Johnny's bloody shirt; then, he hands them a gun and a roll of money with instructions to hop on the freight train to Windrixville that runs at 3:15 a.m. In Windrixville they should climb to the top of Jay Mountain and stay a week in the abandoned church there. 

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This chapter mainly concerns Ponyboy and Johnny and what happens to them one fateful night. As they return home one night, they hear a car horn coming from the blue Mustang, that had earlier picked up the girls. Five drunken Socs emerge and approach the Greasers. They grab Ponyboy and dunk him under the fountain until he thinks he is actually going to drown.

Surprised, Ponyboy becomes aware a few moments later that he is on the ground, shivering and spluttering. Johnny is next to him and tells Ponyboy that he killed one of the Socs. Bob, the former partner of Cherry and the leader of the Socs, is dead on the ground. Johnny tells Ponyboy that he stabbed Bob in an act of self-defence to save both Ponyboy and Johnny from being beaten up again. When Bob fell, the other Socs ran away. Ponyboy panics when he hears this.

They decide to go to Dallas for help. Dallas listens to their tale and congratulates Johnny for killing a Soc. Dallas shows his loyalty to his friends by his immediate aid. He gives Ponyboy dry clothes and finds money and a gun for Johnny. He tells them to take the train into the countryside and directs them to an abandoned church he knows of.

The two boys jump a train and Ponyboy tries to pretend that this is some kidn of nightmare. When they jump off the train, Ponyboy gets directions from a farmer about where the church is and does his best to disguise his identity, but he knows that this is futile. They find the church and collapse onto the floor, falling asleep.

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The most important event in chapter four of The Outsiders occurs at the park when Johnny and Ponyboy are attacked by a group of Soc boys.  The Socs' unofficial leader, Bob, threatens that Ponyboy needs to wash his greasy hair, and the boys proceed to dunk Ponyboy in the fountain.  Ponyboy blacks out during the attack, and when he comes to, he realizes that Johnny has stabbed and killed Bob with his switch blade.  The attack in the park and Bob's murder changes the direction of the novel, forcing Johnny and Ponyboy to flee their hometown and hide out in the abandoned church in Windrixville.

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