Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead by Tom Stoppard

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What is the major dramatic question in Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead? What question has been pursued throughout the play is answered in the moment of climax?

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Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead is a play by Tom Stoppard that premiered at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 1966. Its protagonists are two minor characters from Shakespeare's Hamlet, the courtiers Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. This choice of protagonists seems to reflect the seminal line from Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock":

No! I am not Prince Hamlet, nor was meant to be;
Am an attendant lord, one that will do
To swell a progress, start a scene or two ...

In other words, these are supporting characters whose very existence is simply intended to fill in the stories of other...

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To reply to the other answer, fate is not the premise of the play, the premise is that we choose are own fate, at the end Rosencrantz says, " there was a point, where we could of said no, but I don't remember..." .The point is Hamlet asks three times, were you sent for? They avoid it and then they finally confess that they were sent for. They loose Hamlet's trust right then. Then when their on the boat they could of told Hamlet that he was being sent to England to be killed, but they didn't. In the end they decided their own fate by being " neutral to their will and matter." 

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