What is the main theme of "How do I love thee?" by Elizabeth Browning?

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In this poem, the speaker expresses all of the myriad ways that she loves her beloved, to whom she speaks (this is a device called apostrophe: when the speaker addresses someone who is absent or dead or cannot respond). She says that she loves him as far as her "soul can reach" and during the day and at night, by "candle-light." She loves him "freely," as though it were a moral requirement, and "purely," because she must. She loves him "with the passion put to use / In [her] old griefs, and with [her] childhood's faith," with the force of the strongest feelings known to both old and young. She loves him with a force she didn't think was still possible, with a love she last experienced when she was young and had heroes and "saints." She loves him with all of her, her happiness and sadness, her body and soul: everything that is her. Finally, she says that, if God allows it, she will continue to love him, and to love him even "better," after her death. Ultimately, then, the poem's theme is that true love knows no bounds, not even the grave.

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The main theme of this poem, not surprisingly, is love.  In fact there's really not much other than love going on in this poem.

In the poem, written in 1845 while she was being courted by the man who would become her husband (the English poet Robert Browning) she expresses her love for him in various ways.

To the extent that the poem is about something other than love, it is able to tell us something about her beliefs.  We can see her beliefs by looking at what she compares her love to.  She talks about the ability of her soul to love (Christian belief) and her belief that she will love him even after death.  She also talks about loving him like men strive for right, implying she believes people try to be good.

But overall, this is a love poem and nothing else.

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