What is the main theme for Frankenstein, described in a sentence, not only a word?

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Mary Shelley's Frankenstein deals heavily with pursuing knowledge and science. This pursuit, however, does not lend itself to positive results, because it goes unchecked. It begs the question: even if someone is capable of manipulating scientific principles, should the natural order of things be disrupted simply for the sake...

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Mary Shelley's Frankenstein deals heavily with pursuing knowledge and science. This pursuit, however, does not lend itself to positive results, because it goes unchecked. It begs the question: even if someone is capable of manipulating scientific principles, should the natural order of things be disrupted simply for the sake of doing so? Frankenstein becomes so overly ambitious regarding his scientific capabilities that he does not question whether or not he should continue with his experiment.

Frankenstein quickly becomes disgusted with the monster's appearance, judging him based on physical appearance rather than his internal nature—which is one of great innocence. The monster finds himself forced into isolation, cut off from the rest of the world and his creator. Victor, too, lives in seclusion, keeping most of his activities secret from society. These characters suffer from their detachment from the community, indicating that such isolation does not benefit anyone and that some scientific pursuits should be restrained.

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