In Another Country by Ernest Hemingway

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What is the main conflict, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution of the story "In Another Country" by Ernest Hemingway?

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The main conflict in this story, in general, is the struggle of the soldiers in dealing with the traumatic experiences of the war. The more particular conflict with the American (the narrator) includes the experience of the war but also focuses on his feelings of inadequacy and alienation. He feels that his friends are more worthy of their medals than he is of his own. He is, of course, "in another country" and perhaps feels an even greater sense of alienation because of that. He looks to the major for some wisdom or hope, but the major is largely cynical.

The rising action deals mainly with the American's interaction with the major. Although it is not explicitly stated, the American seems to be looking for a bit of hope or some kind of way to put the war, and a return to normal life, into a decent perspective. The dialogue becomes more intense when the major warns the American to avoid marriage. He loses his temper at the climax . The American realizes that the major is overcome with...

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