What is the main conflict in The Bronze Bow?

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The main external conflict between Daniel and the Romans induces a profound internal conflict within the young man's soul. Despite being thoroughly determined to drive the hated Roman oppressor from Israel, Daniel becomes conflicted over the violent methods adopted by the zealots to achieve this overriding aim.

Through his experiences...

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The main external conflict between Daniel and the Romans induces a profound internal conflict within the young man's soul. Despite being thoroughly determined to drive the hated Roman oppressor from Israel, Daniel becomes conflicted over the violent methods adopted by the zealots to achieve this overriding aim.

Through his experiences of serving with Rosh, Daniel witnesses first-hand the corrosive effects of hatred and violence on the soul—how they can so easily transform even the most ardent freedom-fighters into common thieves and cutthroats, who think nothing of robbing their own people (the very people they're supposed to be fighting for).

In due course, Daniel comes to realize that violence solves nothing, which is why he finally resolves his inner conflict by leaving behind his former life as a zealot and chooses instead to embrace Jesus Christ and his message of peace.

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The main conflict is between Daniel and the Romans.

A conflict is a struggle between opposing forces.  This can be between two characters, between a character and his or her self, or between a character and the setting.  In this case, Daniel’s conflict with the Romans is based on his condition as a slave and their killing of his family.

Daniel faces internal conflicts when he can’t decide whether to follow Rosh or Jesus.  He wants to be the one to fight for his family, but he also wants change.

Jesus is a calming and focusing influence on Daniel.  He helps give him something positive to focus on, rather than relying on the negative.

When Jesus asks Daniel what he vowed, he responds.

“To fight!”  Daniel stopped…trying to remember the exact words they had spoken…. “To live and to die for God’s victory.” (Ch. 21, p. 226)

Jesus responds that this is not a vow of hate.  He sees potential in David.  He knows that there is instability everywhere, and conflict everywhere, but violence and anger is not the answer.

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