What made Muammar al- Gaddafi want to seize power?

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Perhaps by design or by sheer accident, not much is known about Gadaffi's origins in terms of why he wanted to seize power.  His background involved an early love for General Nasser and his anti- Western stance.  Being born into a wealthy family enabled Gadaffi to focus on political activism and an embrace of socialism.  As a student in military college, he began to covet control of Libya.  Once he gained power, Gadaffi quickly understood that he could gain funding and public adulation if he transformed Libya into a haven for anti- Western activists that shared his own dislike of the West.  In this, his desire to seize power became twofold.  On one hand, Gadaffi could continue to be an antagonist to the West in consolidating his power in Libya.  Another element to him seizing power was that in making his nation so hospitable to anti- Western elements, Gadaffi would always be "popular" to those who held grudges or hatred towards Western capitalist nations.  Accordingly, Gadaffi's seizure of power was predicated upon an irrational hatred of the West that was continued in order to consolidate his own power base and advance his own agenda.

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a0000 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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persons like are brute in nature. they are pugnacious and inhumane in nature. within most of us, lives a gaddafi or osama who always bears animal-quality and beast-disqualifications among their mindsets. They deserve such devastation. As alike other historic (hysteric) autocrats, GADDAFI cracked down as an exemplifiction of social-darwinism and proved that EVERY ACTION HAS ITS OPPOSITE AND EQUAL REACTION.

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xhamoodx | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

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Well The Most Thinkable Reason Why Is Because Of Hes Full Of Himself And didnt care About his Country Hope I helped ^^

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