In Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, what figurative language is used in Juliet's soliloquy, Act II, Scene 2, Lines 33-49?O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo?Deny thy father and refuse thy...

In Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, what figurative language is used in Juliet's soliloquy, Act II, Scene 2, Lines 33-49?

O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet.

'Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What's Montague? It is nor hand, nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O, be some other name!
What's in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet;
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo called,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name,
And for that name which is no part of thee
Take all myself. (Act II, Scene 2)

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Tamara K. H. | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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Alliteration can be seen in the line: "it is nor hand, nor foot, nor arm, nor for face, nor any other part belonging to a man." This is an example of alliteration because the consonant "n" is repeated with the repetition of the word "nor." Alliteration is a figure of speech because it makes use of redundant repetition in order to emphasize a point. This line also makes use of climax, because it begins with the least important body elements, such as "hand" or "foot" and ends with the most important, such as "face," and finally, "nor any other part belonging to a man." This final phrase is especially important because it can be translated as a sexual innuendo.

Parallelism can be seen in the line: "Deny thy father and refuse thy name." Shakespeare used the parallel syntactical structure of verb+pronoun+noun/verb+pronoun+noun in order to emphasize the point.

Antimetabole can be seen in the line: "So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call'd." This is an example of antimetabole because the line repeats the verb "to be" through the conjugations "would" and "were" and then reverses them: "Romeo would, were he not." Also, the clause "were he not Romeo call'd" reverses the normal word order and is therefore an example of hyperbaton. Normally we would say something like, "if he was not called Romeo."

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