Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen

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What literary devices does Jane Austen use in Sense and Sensibility  that contribute to the success of the novel?

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Three literary devices that contribute to the success of the novel are antithesis, point-of-view, and irony.

Antithesis is the putting of opposites together. As the title of the novel indicates, the story is about as antitheses between the overly sensible and emotionally self-controlled sister, Elinor, is contrasted sharply with the overly sensitive, emotional, "drama queen" sister, Marianne. This antithesis allows for an exploration of both extremes: emotional over-control and emotional excess. The antitheses go beyond that, however. For example, the overly honorable Edward provides an antithesis to Lucy Steele's crass opportunism, and Elinor's education and good manners are an antithesis to both Miss Steeles' vulgarity.

The novel is told from the point-of-view of Elinor, and this is another successful strategy. Only we, as readers, know what Elinor knows. For example, since Elinor doesn't know if Marianne and Willoughby are engaged, we don't know either. We also don't know that Lucy and...

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