The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

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What literary devices, with examples, are in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde?

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There are lots of allusions present in the text. For example, on the first page, Mr. Utterson is quoted as saying, "I incline to Cain's heresy . . . . I let my brother go to the devil in his . . . own way." Cain and Abel were the first two sons of Adam and Eve, and when God preferred Abel's sacrifices to Cain's, Cain grew angry and slew his brother. When God came to him to ask him were Abel was, Cain replied, "'I know not; am I my brother's keeper?" Thus, Utterson compares his own attitude toward his fellows with Cain's; it is not his job to keep track of others or to regulate their behavior.

Using another allusion , Mr. Enfield says that Hyde "was like some damned Juggernaut." We now use the word juggernaut (with a lowercase "j") to refer to some unstoppable force, but it was, originally, the name for a giant wagon bearing a statue of the Hindu god Krishna, under which devotees would allow their bodies to be crushed as a sacrifice to the god. Hyde moved like just such a wagon—as though...

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