What literary device starts at the beginning of chapter 2 of Rumble Fish?

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At the beginning of the second chapter of S.E. Hinton’s “Rumble Fish”, the author uses foreshadowing to set up events that are yet to come. This literary technique establishes a mood for a scene by letting the reader know in advance what will happen, to some extent.

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At the beginning of the second chapter of S.E. Hinton’s “Rumble Fish”, the author uses foreshadowing to set up events that are yet to come. This literary technique establishes a mood for a scene by letting the reader know in advance what will happen, to some extent.

Hinton writes:

I was hanging out at Benny’s, playing pool, when I heard Biff Wilcox was looking to kill me.

Because of some events that had transpired in the previous chapter—namely an incident with Anita, a girl at their school—Biff is upset. It is clear from the novel’s narration that they are building up to a violent confrontation. Fortunately, there is no actual death, like is foreshadowed, but there is a serious injury, as Rusty-James gets injured by Biff’s knife.

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S.E. Hinton opens Chapter Two of Rumble Fish with foreshadowing.

Foreshadowing is a way for a writer to give a hint of things to come. It lets the writer build suspense and tease details of what might happen later in the story. 

S.E. Hinton writes: "I was hanging out at Benny's, playing pool, when I heard Biff Wilcox was looking to kill me." The narrator of the story, Rusty-James, is spending time at a local hangout for junior high kids. He's warned that because of his interaction with Anita at school, Biff is now after him.

The interaction is also a callback to the beginning of the book, where the adult narrator comes across an old friend on the beach. His friend remarks on his knife scar -- the one Biff gives him in the fight they have after Rusty-James is warned about Biff's violent intentions.

S.E. Hinton uses the opening sentence of Chapter Two to foreshadow the fight with Biff. While the fight doesn't end in death, it does give the narrator a scar that lasts for the rest of his life.

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In chapter 2 of S.E. Hinton's Rumblefish Hinton uses the technique of foreshadowing to hint at what is going to happen in the story.

I was hanging out at Benny's, playing pool, when I heard Biff Wilcox was looking to kill me.

This sets the stage for what will happen later. We get the impression that their will be a fight between the two boys. Eventually they do.

The author uses the literary device tone or mood by creating a sense of seriousness. Rusty-James took the threat more serious after talking to Midget.

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