What are the most helpful secondary sources to include in a bibliography for the study of the King James Bible?

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Stephen Holliday | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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What follows is a list of bibliographical resources for the study of the King James Bible, not in alphabetical order, but listed in the order of usefulness (in my view).  The first item you need for your bibliography, however, is a citation for the King James Bible itself, which has been published in more versions than almost any book ever published.  I suggest you use The Bible: Authorized King James Version with Apocrypha, published by Oxford University Press, 1997.

Again, the secondary (that is, books and articles about the Bible) sources listed here are not in alphabetical order, so your bibliography, which will probably be in the MLA format, will need to be in alphabetical order:

  • Chrystal, David. Begat: The King James Bible and the English Language. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.
  • McGrath, A. In the Beginning: The Story of the King James Bible. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 2001.
  • Campbell, G.  Bible: The Story of the King James Version 1611-2011. London: Oxford University Press, 2010.
  • Norton, David. The King James Bible: A Short History from Tyndale to Today.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011.
  • Hamlin, H. and N. W. Jones (eds.).  The King James Bible after 400 Years. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010).
  • Herbert, A. S.  Historical Catalogue of Printed Editions of the English Bible, 1525-1961. London: British and Foreign Bible Society, 1968.
  • Muir, W. Our Grand Old Bible.London: Marshall, Morgan and Scott, 1911).
  • Thuesen, P. J. In Discordance with the Scriptures: American Protestant Battles over Translating the Bible. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999)
  • Carson, D. J. The King James Version Debate: A Plea for Realism. Grand Rapids: Baker, 1979.
  • Farstad, A. L. The New King James Version in the Great Tradition. (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1989).
  • Lewis, J. P. The English Bible from KJV to NIV. (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1982).

The first four entries on this list comprise the core of the important scholarly works on the KJV, and although there are hundreds of articles in journals about the KJV, articles tend to focus on very narrow aspects of translation issues and interpretation of the KJV and are too specialized for a bibliography on the history of the KJV.

Sources:

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