What is the link between Sergeant Major Morris and the White family in "The Monkey's Paw"?

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The text of the story does not explicitly say how Sergeant Major Morris knows the White family; but, the connection is implied by the way Mr. White acts when he sees his old friend coming up the path.

"The old man rose with hospitable haste, and, opening the door was...

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The text of the story does not explicitly say how Sergeant Major Morris knows the White family; but, the connection is implied by the way Mr. White acts when he sees his old friend coming up the path.

"The old man rose with hospitable haste, and, opening the door was heard condoling with the new arrival."

If this had been a friend of Mrs. White or the son, either of these two would have gone to the door first to greet the visitor. As it is, Mr. White makes a great excited effort to be the first one to meet Morris and get him out of the inclement weather. Then, it is Mr. White who introduces Morris to his wife and son, suggesting that he and Morris are friends and the other two have not met him before. Mr. White also seems very proud to introduce this man to his family.

The only other clue the reader gets to how Mr. White knows Morris is when he says, "When he went away he was a slip of a youth in the warehouse. Now look at him." The reader can infer by this quote that Mr. White and Sergeant Morris probably knew each other from working in a warehouse when they were young.

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