In Swift's Gulliver's Travels, how do the Lilliputians and Brobdingnagians treat Gulliver? What does Gulliver learn from each?

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Both societies treat Gulliver as a curiosity at first. The Lilliputians "imprison" him and make him a source of entertainment. The Brobdingnagians carry him around like we might carry a small dog.

Eventually, the Lilliputians put him to work for them, and the Brobdingnagians expected his antics to generate revenue...

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Both societies treat Gulliver as a curiosity at first. The Lilliputians "imprison" him and make him a source of entertainment. The Brobdingnagians carry him around like we might carry a small dog.

Eventually, the Lilliputians put him to work for them, and the Brobdingnagians expected his antics to generate revenue for the kingdom. In neither place did citizens treat Gulliver as an equal. The first link below is an essay that talks about how the people of Liliput and Brobdingnab considered Gulliver a "monster" and asserts that he embraced that notion.

The question about what Gulliver learned is an interesting one because one could claim that he really didn't learn anything of value until he reached the land of the Houynymnymns--and even that knowledge led him to a loathing of mankind! Gulliver did learn how to relate to a wide variety of people, and he demostrated an adeptness with language and observation. He saw the futility of trying to change the fundamental character of Lilliputian and Brobdingnagian government and ideals, but whether he really learned anything is questionable.

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