what lierary devices are used in this quote?"Wherefore not; since all the powers of nature call so earnestly for the confession of sin, that these black weeds have sprung up out of a buried...

what lierary devices are used in this quote?

"Wherefore not; since all the powers of nature call so earnestly for the confession of sin, that these black weeds have sprung up out of a buried heart, to make manifest an unspoken crime?"

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amymc | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

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The personification of nature comes to mind.  Generally, the belief of the Puritan era (and long before) was that sin was so bad that the natural world, of which God was the leader, would react to human's wrongdoing and even rise up and expose the sinner.  This concept is manifest in the line, " ...all the powers of nature call so earnestly for the confession of sin...."   In this particular case, it is implied that Roger Chillingworth sees a growth emerging from the heart of Arthur Dimmesdale, indicating that his heart was as black as the weeds he saw there.  These weeds indicate his sin of infidelity despite the fact that neither he nor Hester Prynne would confess the name of her baby's father.

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