What is Lewis saying about the relationship between good and evil? 

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C.S. Lewis’s The Great Divorce is the tale of individuals attempting to get to—or running away from—heaven in the afterlife. Their inability to get to heaven on their own is usually due to some lingering sin, an evil attached to them that needs to be relieved from their person in order to receive true absolution. Lewis’s narrator witnesses this process several times, but more often than not, people choose to hold on to their qualms or return to the Grey Place from whence they came. Many of these qualms boil down to short-sightedness or idolatry, but Lewis argues that they all have the same effect: separation from Heaven, which is separation from God.

Though Lewis is not throwing Christian theology in your face, he is clearly working as the Christian apologist here. His depictions of Hell and (almost?) Heaven are fantastical and of his own imagination, but their nature, if not their appearance, agrees with the Christian Scriptures: Heaven is the presence of God, only to be received...

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