In "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" what lessons does the Grangerford/Shepherdson feud teach Huck and us? What is ironic about their attending church?

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In this novel, Huck is usually a pretty laid-back kid who is great and going with the flow and rolling with the punches(to use a couple of cliches).  He gets upset about things every once in a while, but gets over them quickly and moves on with his life.  However, the feud between the two families really leaves him upset.  He gets caught in a huge battle, a battle that he feels responsible for because of his role in the love affair between Miss Sophia and Harney.  Usually quite verbose and talkative, Huck states this of the battle:  "I don't want to talk much about the next day.  I reckon I'll cut it pretty short."  Later he says,

"I ain't a-going to tell all that happened-it would make me sick again if I was to do that.  I wished I hadn't ever come ashore that night to see such things.  I ain't ever going to get shut of them-lots of times I dream about them."

Huck learns a great lesson about the reality of violence.  In the beginning of the book...

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