What lessons did Jane learn from Lowood? What did she take from her experience there?

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Jane comes into her own as a person at Lowood, despite the horrific conditions of the school. For the first time, she is in a place where she is not made out to be a burden. Jane is given the chance to gain an education and find a way to...

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Jane comes into her own as a person at Lowood, despite the horrific conditions of the school. For the first time, she is in a place where she is not made out to be a burden. Jane is given the chance to gain an education and find a way to contribute to the world. She later becomes a teacher at the school, gathering the experience she will need when she starts work as a governess.

Most importantly, Jane undergoes intense moral and spiritual evolution at Lowood. Her friendship with Helen Burns teaches her the importance of patience and faith in God. Despite her suffering and ill treatment, Helen remains faithful to God until her dying breath. Jane was unsure about God's benevolence until that point, and she asks Helen on Helen's deathbed, "You are sure, Helen, that there is such a place as heaven; and that our souls can get to it when we die?" Helen reaffirms her belief in a loving God, something which brings comfort to the lonely, often unloved Jane.

Later in the novel, Jane's faith, begun in Lowood, gives her strength when she must leave Mr. Rochester after she discovers he is still married. It reinforces her self-respect and will to follow through with her own principles in spite of significant temptation from Rochester to live as his mistress since they cannot marry.

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Although she experiences much physical deprivation at Lowood, here for the first time Jane makes friends. For the first time, she is seen and appreciated for herself and not treated as an odious outcast, even though Mr. Brocklehurst tries to paint her as a liar. For the first time, people evaluate Jane on her own merits. At Lowood, Jane loses her feelings of being singled out for the special abuse, unfair treatment and degradation that she experienced in her aunt's home.

Jane makes two chief friends at Lowood: Helen Burns and Miss Temple. She becomes the closest of friends to Helen, learning from the example of her friend's patience and forbearance not to react so angrily to people when they treat her unfairly. She also learns from Helen's Christianity (Helen's patience and forbearance are part of this) not to hate and want to immediately harm those who hate you. Jane will never fully attain Helen's patience and Christian charity, but Helen's example smooths Jane's rougher edges. 

From both Helen and Miss Temple, Jane also learns what it is to have someone believe in you and stand by you. When Jane accidentally breaks a slate and Mr. Brocklehurst chides her for it, Miss Temple whispers that she knew it was an accident. Such small acts of kindness start to heal Jane's sore heart.

Helen offers Jane unconditional acceptance, the kind of friendship she has always craved:

 I never tired of Helen Burns; nor ever ceased to cherish for her a sentiment of attachment, as strong, tender, and respectful as any that ever animated my heart. How could it be otherwise, when Helen, at all times and under all circumstances, evinced for me a quiet and faithful friendship, which ill-humour never soured ...

Helen will die, but Jane will never her forget her or her example and will carry some of her goodness with her out into the world. 

From the school as a whole, Jane learns self-discipline and self-control, as well as how to be part of a group. She also gets the education necessary to earn her living as a governess. From Helen and Miss Temple she learns to be slower to anger and experiences love from both that helps heal her after her earlier abusive upbringing. Despite all the horrors of the school, she feels much better about herself, more whole, when she leaves the school than when she starts.

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