The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams

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What is the lesson of The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams?

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Domenick Franecki eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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The moral lesson of The Glass Menagerie is that one can try to escape the past and one's ties to family, but to no avail. The hold one's family and past has on one is tenacious and strong. At the end of the play, Tom Wingfield leaves his mother and sister, Amanda and Laura, respectively, though his mother believes that he will protect and care for them forever. Instead, the pressure they place on him drives him away, as it had driven away his father years before.

Tom believes that he has escaped his sister's memory and her call for help, but wherever he goes, he sees her in his mind and thinks of her. He says at the end of the play, "Oh, Laura, Laura, I tried to leave you behind me, but I am more faithful than I intended to be!" The entire play is Tom's recollection of his sister and...

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Gracie O'Hara eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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