What language technique in To Kill a Mockingbird is Harper Lee using in " ...the court house sagged in the square..."? Is "sagged in the square" alliteration? Or could you say that "the court...

What language technique in To Kill a Mockingbird is Harper Lee using in " ...the court house sagged in the square..."?

 Is "sagged in the square" alliteration? Or could you say that "the court house sagged..." is personification?  I'm so confused. Please help! Thanks =D

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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(I have edited your question since only one query is allowed per eNotes post.)

You are definitely right about the quotation including a personification, in which an inanimate object is given human characteristics, as in the "courthouse sagged," likening the building to a tired old man. There is also alliteration (or, perhaps, more specifically consonance) found in the quote with the repeated "s" sounds in "sagged" and "square." The same two terms can also be found previously in the same sentence--the "grass grew" includes successive "gr" sounds. It could also be considered a hyperbole, or exaggeration, since the courthouse is probably not as unstable as the statement suggests. It also provides a strong sense of imagery, or a mental picture, of the building.

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