What language and dramatic features from the following quotations would best help to decide how to dramatize this soliloquy for an audience? "Hie thee hither, / That I may pour my spirits in thine ear, / And chastise with the valor of my tongue / All that impeded thee from the golden round" and "unsex me here / and fill me, from the crown to the toe, top full of direst cruelty!"

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After Lady Macbeth receives the letter from her husband in which he tells her of his experience with the Weird Sisters, she says,

Hie thee hither,

That I may pour my spirits in thine ear,

And chastise with the valor of my tongue

All that impedes thee from the golden...

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After Lady Macbeth receives the letter from her husband in which he tells her of his experience with the Weird Sisters, she says,

Hie thee hither,

That I may pour my spirits in thine ear,

And chastise with the valor of my tongue

All that impedes thee from the golden round (I.5.28-31).

Lady Macbeth wants her husband to hurry home so she can convince him to go after the crown now.  She uses a metaphor to compare her "spirits" (her ruthlessness, ambition, and courage) to a liquid that can be "pour[ed]," as though Macbeth is an empty vessel she can fill up with her own bitterness.  Further, Lady Macbeth personifies her tongue when she speaks of its "valor"; valor refers to the strength of spirit that enables one to meet danger with resolve.  Lady Macbeth means that she will speak strengthening words to him, words that will increase his courage to face the risks that will get him to the throne the fastest.  She also uses the phrase "golden round" to mean the crown, by which she's referring to the kingship of Scotland.  She doesn't just want him to acquire the crown itself, so the crown is standing in for the position of king when she uses this example of metonymy: when a writer uses something related to the thing he means to stand in for the thing itself.  In this case, the "golden round" stands in for the position she wants him to have.  Because figurative language is meant to enrich and layer meaning, it would make sense to emphasize words like "pour" and "valor" and stretch out the long vowel sounds in "golden round," as these are the words that indicate figurative meanings and enhance her speech's content.

Once Lady Macbeth learns Macbeth and Duncan are on their way to her home, she prays to evil spirits, asking them to "unsex [her] here / and fill [her], from the crown to the toe, top full of direst cruelty!" (I.5.48-50).  Here, Lady Macbeth wants to lose any qualities associated with femininity. She doesn't want to be compassionate, remorseful, or kind.  Instead, Lady Macbeth wants to possess the qualities more often associated with men: the abilities to be ruthless and cruel when necessary.  Interestingly, she now seems to compare herself to an empty vessel, via metaphor, just as she compared Macbeth in the other quote.  It is also notable that she calls the top of her head her "crown;" while this isn't really figurative language, it does seem to be careful and purposeful word choice since Lady Macbeth hopes to become queen.  Therefore, an actor might emphasize "unsex," "fill," and "crown," speaking quite slowly as though praying because that is essentially what Lady Macbeth is doing.

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