What are land and sea breezes?

2 Answers | Add Yours

ncchemist's profile pic

ncchemist | eNotes Employee

Posted on

Natural wind is the movement of atmospheric gasses above the surface of the Earth.  Wind ultimately occurs due to the existence of different air pressure gradients in the atmosphere, thus causing air to move from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure.  These gradients are caused by different factors including temperature and the rotation of the planet.

Land and sea breezes specifically refer to the movement of wind along the coastline of a major body of water like the ocean.  During the day, the sunlight warms up the land and water.  Due to differing densities, the land warms up faster than the water.  This causes the air above the land to warm up faster and rise, thus pulling air off of the cooler water to blow onto the coast.  This is referred to as a sea breeze.  At night, the opposite occurs.  The water retains its heat much longer than the land, thus causing the wind to blow from the land onto the water.  This is referred to as a land breeze.

Sources:
sid-sarfraz's profile pic

sid-sarfraz | Student, Graduate | (Level 2) Salutatorian

Posted on

 

The Movement of air from high pressure to low pressure areas, is called wind.

Wind can occur in two forms:-

  1. Large Scale (Monsoon and Planetary Winds)
  2. Small Scale (Land and Sea breeze)

After sunset when warmed air by land blows towards the water, land breeze occurs.

Sea breeze occurs after sunrise when cold air blows towards land from water.

Differences Between Sea breeze and Land breeze

  • Sea Breeze occurs after sunrise at daytime where as, Land Breeze occurs at night after sunset.
  • Winds blow from land towards water is land breeze where as, Sea breeze is when air blows from water towards land.
  • In Land breeze, air blows from low pressure to high pressure where as, In Sea breeze air blows from high pressure to low pressure.

%MCEPASTEBIN%

Images:
This image has been Flagged as inappropriate Click to unflag
Image (1 of 1)

We’ve answered 318,911 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question