What kinds of figurative language is in the poem and why? Thank you.THE GRIESLY BRIDE"Lie down, my newly married wife;Lie easy as you can.You're young, and ill-accustomed yetTo sleeping with a...

What kinds of figurative language is in the poem and why? Thank you.

THE GRIESLY BRIDE

"Lie down, my newly married wife;
Lie easy as you can.
You're young, and ill-accustomed yet
To sleeping with a man."

The snow was deep, the moon was full
As it shown on the cabin floor.
His young bride rose without a word
And ran barefoot through the door.

He up and followed, fast and sure,
And an angry man was he,
But his young bride wasn't e'er in sight,
And only the moon shone clearly.

He followed her track through the new deep snow,
Calling out loud her name.
Only the dingoes in the hills
Yowled back at him again.

Then the hair stood up along his neck
And his angry mind was gone,
For where the two-foot track gave out,
A four-footed track went on.

Her nightgown lay upon the snow
As it might on a bed sheet,
And the tracks that led from where it lay
Were never of human feet.

He first started in to walkin' back,
Then he began to run,
And his quarry turned all in her track
And hunted him in turn.

An empty bed still waits for him
As he lies in a crimson tide.
Beware, beware, oh trapper men,
Beware of a griesly bride.

Asked on by cjdoczzs

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lsumner | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted on

The following stanza has figurative language in that his mind was angry. Figurative language makes comparisons to unrelated things or personification is used in this instance. Personification is used to attribute human qualities to something that is not a person. While the brain is part of the human body, it is not known to have feelings such as anger.

Then the hair stood up along his neck
And his angry mind was gone,
For where the two-foot track gave out,
A four-footed track went on.

Also, there is another example of a figurative language in the last stanza. In the lines that speak of crimson tide, this is referring to the man lying in blood.

An empty bed still waits for him
As he lies in a crimson tide.
Beware, beware, oh trapper men,
Beware of a griesly bride.

These are two examples of figurative language in the poem.  If I may add to the above analysis, the crimson tide could be saying the man is lying is an ocean of blood. The tide comparison has something to do with a body of water and the crimson represents the color of blood.

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