illustration of author Mitch Albom sitting next to Morrie Schwartz, who is lying in a bed

Tuesdays With Morrie

by Mitch Albom
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What kind of person is Morrie in Tuesdays With Morrie?

In Tuesdays With Morrie, Morrie is a strong personality who experiences intense emotions. However, his emotions are under the control of his wisdom, meaning that he is able to be a positive and inspiring influence in the lives of those around him.

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In Tuesdays With Morrie, Morrie is a college professor and a teacher by vocation as well as by profession. He is a man who has always been clever and thoughtful, but unlike many intellectually gifted people, he has gained true wisdom over the course of his life. Mitch Albom ...

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In Tuesdays With Morrie, Morrie is a college professor and a teacher by vocation as well as by profession. He is a man who has always been clever and thoughtful, but unlike many intellectually gifted people, he has gained true wisdom over the course of his life. Mitch Albom clearly regards Morrie as a moral and philosophical teacher, someone who has important ideas to impart.

Morrie shows humility, patience, and a keen curiosity about others. When he talks to Ted Koppel, a celebrity who is used to interviewing world leaders and Hollywood stars, he makes a strong impression, at least partly be returning Koppel's interest and treating the interview as a conversation. This is the way in which he approaches all his interactions with others.

Morrie is not a natural stoic or contemplative. He has strong emotions, which he does not try to repress, and demonstrates a fierce attachment to life. However, his wisdom allows him to put his illness into perspective, to accept it, and to live with it. His great strength as a teacher is that he shares what he has learned out of a genuine desire to help, rather than from egotism, which may have been a factor in his personality once but is now under careful control, along with self-pity. Morrie allows himself to experience negative emotions—but not to indulge them—and is committed to exercising a positive influence on his environment for as long as he can.

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