What kind of language is used In The Picture of Dorian Gray, third paragraph of chapter 11? Many thanksFor the wonderful beauty that had so facinated Basil Hallwards, and many others besides him,...

What kind of language is used In The Picture of Dorian Gray, third paragraph of chapter 11? Many thanks

For the wonderful beauty that had so facinated Basil Hallwards, and many others besides him, seemed never to leave him.  Even those who had heard the most evil things against him, and from time to time strange rumours about his mode of life crept through London and became the chatter of the clubs, could not believe anything to his dishonour when they saw him.  He has always the look of one who had kept himself unspotted from the world.  Men who talked grossly became silent when Dorian Gray entered the room.  There was something in the purity of his face that rebuked them.  His mere presence seemed to recall to them yhe memory of the innocence that they had tarnished.  They wondered how one so charming and graceful as he was could have escaped the stain of an age that was at once sordid and sensual.

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M.P. Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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The language used by Oscar Wilde in this excerpt of The Picture of Dorian Gray is intended to be ironic and metaphorical in order to tone down the obvious homoerotic tendencies of the description.

In describing both the love that Basil Hallward feels for Dorian, as well as the questionable nature of Dorian Gray's after-hour activities that cause so much of a a stir, Wilde uses a form of code-language under which homosexuality is rampant. Since homosexual practices were considered illegal in England since the Criminal Act of 1885, Wilde had to be careful sending his message across. In fact, the novel was considered unnatural, and scandalous after its publication.

However, focus on the amount of sensuality, romance, and sensory depiction of the emotions of both men. The ironic tone of the secrecy that society maintains over Dorian's reputation shows the hypocrisy of the society which Wilde hated so much,himself. Therefore, the language is homoerotic, ironic, sensual, and fully romantic, as the genre dictates, in the pure and sincere description of human emotion.

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