What is Victor's one remaining human emotion at the end of Frankenstein?

Victor's one remaining human emotion at the end of Frankenstein is hope.

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At the end of Frankenstein, Victor cuts a pathetic figure, if not a tragic one, as he makes his final farewell to Walton, saying,

Farewell, Walton! Seek happiness in tranquillity and avoid ambition, even if it be only the apparently innocent one of distinguishing yourself in science and...

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At the end of Frankenstein, Victor cuts a pathetic figure, if not a tragic one, as he makes his final farewell to Walton, saying,

Farewell, Walton! Seek happiness in tranquillity and avoid ambition, even if it be only the apparently innocent one of distinguishing yourself in science and discoveries. Yet why do I say this? I have myself been blasted in these hopes, yet another may succeed.

With his dying breath, Victor gives Walton a piece of advice, then quickly takes it back, so that his last words are a denial of his penultimate words. It seems that there could be no clearer indication that he has learned nothing. He himself has been ambitious—and so, in a different field, is Walton. He tells Walton to relinquish ambition in favor of a quiet, undistinguished life, then decides that the quest for glory is not hopeless after all.

Victor may have no hope left specifically for himself, but he will not give up the hope of betterment for humanity in general. After the myriad of horrors his ambition has produced, hope remains at the end. The reader is reminded of the Greek myth of Pandora's box, related by Hesiod, in which hope remains after all the evils of the world have flown out of the box. In both the Theogony and the Works and Days, Hesiod relates this story alongside that of Prometheus, the character from Greek mythology with whom Shelley most explicitly compares Victor Frankenstein.

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