What is unusual about Wemmick’s wedding in Chapter 55 of Great Expectations?

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Wemmick's wedding is unusual because it is so nonchalant and seemingly unplanned.  Wemmick asks Pip to go for a walk with him on Monday, and Pip agrees.  On Monday morning, the two begin their walk, with Wemmick carrying a fishing pole over his shoulder, even though they are not going fishing. ...

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Wemmick's wedding is unusual because it is so nonchalant and seemingly unplanned.  Wemmick asks Pip to go for a walk with him on Monday, and Pip agrees.  On Monday morning, the two begin their walk, with Wemmick carrying a fishing pole over his shoulder, even though they are not going fishing.  On their walk they happen upon a church, and Wemmick suggests they go in.  He pulls out some gloves which they both don at his direction, and, coincidentally, it seems, the Aged then enters a side door escorting a lady.  Wemmick, feigning surprise, exclaims delightedly, "Halloa!...Here's Miss Skiffins!  Let's have a wedding!"  A clerk and clergyman appear, and Pip, taken completely unawares, finds himself acting "in the capacity of backer or best man" at Wemmick's seemingly spontaneous nuptials!

As they exit the church, Wemmick again shoulders his fishing rod, "triumphantly" exclaiming, "let me ask you whether anybody would suppose this to be a wedding-party!"  After "an excellent breakfast" to celebrate the new union, Wemmick quietly requests that Pip not let Jagger know about his marriage, saying, "this is altogether a Walworth sentiment, please", which Pip understands is "not to be mentioned in Little Britain".

The incident as presented works as brilliant comic relief after the intense events of Magwitch's recapture (Chapter 55).

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